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thranduils-queen:

tacobell-canon:

Ladypug.

what
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jose868:

Harry Belafonte - Jump In The Line (Shake Senora)

"My girl’s name is Senora
I tell you friends, I adore her
And when she dances, oh brother!
She’s a hurricane in all kinds of weather!”

(via electricpowerbottom)

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sneakyfeets:

thlp

sneakyfeets:

thlp

(Source: awwww-cute, via butts-disease)

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susgirl:

thisisteariffic:

Succulent air plant wall planter

via KimFisherDesigns

THIS IS SO COOL

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mtv:

nominee 2 of 6
like or reblog this post to vote lord of the rings for best fandom forever!
scope out all the other nominees and see who’s in the lead. then watch the mtvU fandom awards on sunday, july 27 at 8/7c on mtv to see which o.g. fandom takes the crown!

mtv:

nominee 2 of 6

like or reblog this post to vote lord of the rings for best fandom forever!

scope out all the other nominees and see who’s in the lead. then watch the mtvU fandom awards on sunday, july 27 at 8/7c on mtv to see which o.g. fandom takes the crown!

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mrsweasley:

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I CAN’T BREATHE! I AM SO DONE WITH THIS FUCKING CREW!

(via butts-disease)

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dead-men-talking:


Oldest case of Down’s syndrome from medieval France
by Colin Barras




The oldest confirmed case of Down’s syndrome has been found: the skeleton of a child who died 1500 years ago in early medieval France. According to the archaeologists, the way the child was buried hints that Down’s syndrome was not necessarily stigmatised in the Middle Ages.
Down’s syndrome is a genetic disorder that delays a person’s growth and causes intellectual disability. People with Down’s syndrome have three copies of chromosome 21, rather than the usual two. It was described in the 19th century, but has probably existed throughout human history. However there are few cases of Down’s syndrome in the archaeological record.
The new example comes from a 5th- and 6th-century necropolis near a church in Chalon-sur-Saône in eastern France. Excavations there have uncovered the remains of 94 people, including the skeleton of a young child with a short and broad skull, a flattened skull base and thin cranial bones. These features are common in people with Down’s syndrome, says Maïté Rivollat at the University of Bordeaux in France, who has studied the skeleton with her colleagues.
"I think the paper makes a convincing case for a diagnosis of Down’s syndrome," says John Starbuck at Indiana University in Indianapolis. He has just analysed a 1500-year-old figurine from the Mexican Tolteca culture that he says depicts someone with Down’s syndrome.
Treated well?
Rivollat’s team has studied the way the child with Down’s syndrome was buried, which hasn’t been possible with other ancient cases of the condition. The child was placed on its back in the tomb, in an east-west orientation with the head at the westward end – in common with all of the dead at the necropolis.
According to Rivollat, this suggests the child was treated no differently in death from other members of the community. That in turn hints that they were not stigmatised while alive.
A similar argument was put forward in a 2011 study that described the 1500-year-old burial in Israel of a man with dwarfism (International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, DOI: 10.1002/oa.1285). The body was buried in a similar manner to others at the site, and archaeologists took that as indicating that the man was treated as a normal member of society.
Starbuck is not convinced by this argument. “It can be very difficult to extrapolate cultural values and behaviour from burials or skeletal remains,” he says.
Journal reference: International Journal of Paleopathology, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpp.2014.05.004

dead-men-talking:

Oldest case of Down’s syndrome from medieval France

The oldest confirmed case of Down’s syndrome has been found: the skeleton of a child who died 1500 years ago in early medieval France. According to the archaeologists, the way the child was buried hints that Down’s syndrome was not necessarily stigmatised in the Middle Ages.

Down’s syndrome is a genetic disorder that delays a person’s growth and causes intellectual disability. People with Down’s syndrome have three copies of chromosome 21, rather than the usual two. It was described in the 19th century, but has probably existed throughout human history. However there are few cases of Down’s syndrome in the archaeological record.

The new example comes from a 5th- and 6th-century necropolis near a church in Chalon-sur-Saône in eastern France. Excavations there have uncovered the remains of 94 people, including the skeleton of a young child with a short and broad skull, a flattened skull base and thin cranial bones. These features are common in people with Down’s syndrome, says Maïté Rivollat at the University of Bordeaux in France, who has studied the skeleton with her colleagues.

"I think the paper makes a convincing case for a diagnosis of Down’s syndrome," says John Starbuck at Indiana University in Indianapolis. He has just analysed a 1500-year-old figurine from the Mexican Tolteca culture that he says depicts someone with Down’s syndrome.

Treated well?

Rivollat’s team has studied the way the child with Down’s syndrome was buried, which hasn’t been possible with other ancient cases of the condition. The child was placed on its back in the tomb, in an east-west orientation with the head at the westward end – in common with all of the dead at the necropolis.

According to Rivollat, this suggests the child was treated no differently in death from other members of the community. That in turn hints that they were not stigmatised while alive.

A similar argument was put forward in a 2011 study that described the 1500-year-old burial in Israel of a man with dwarfism (International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, DOI: 10.1002/oa.1285). The body was buried in a similar manner to others at the site, and archaeologists took that as indicating that the man was treated as a normal member of society.

Starbuck is not convinced by this argument. “It can be very difficult to extrapolate cultural values and behaviour from burials or skeletal remains,” he says.

Journal reference: International Journal of Paleopathology, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpp.2014.05.004

(via anthrocentric)

Text

Anonymous said: what do you mean by dominance theory dog trainers?

koryos:

I’ve spoken about this before, though I’m having difficulty finding the exact post. Anyway, for the short version, trainers that claim that dogs are constantly asserting dominance over you and everything else (I’ve seen a trainer claiming that a dog was dominant over… shadows…) are basing these claims off of extremely outdated research on wolf packs from the 70s (not to mention the interesting fact that domestic dogs are not wolves) and their own misinformed biases.

Multiple studies have shown that dominance-based training, which includes things like using physical punishment (choke and shock collars, “alpha rolling,” etc.) and flooding (overexposing the dog to a fear stimulus), both doesn’t work in the long run and can have the unintended consequence of making the dog more aggressive.

If you don’t want to take my word for it, here’s a collection of experts denouncing dominance-based dog training.

And here’s a clip of Cesar Milan using his idea of “dominance” to choke and shove a dog until it gives up and stops fighting him.